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235 result(s)

Exploring the potential benefits of inflation overshooting

Staff Analytical Note 2021-16 Robert Amano, Marc-André Gosselin, Kurt See
After a period with the interest rate at the effective lower bound, temporarily overshooting inflation may offer important economic benefits. This may be especially true for vulnerable segments of the population, such as workers with low attachment to the labour force and the long-term unemployed.

Monetary Policy, Trends in Real Interest Rates and Depressed Demand

Staff Working Paper 2021-27 Paul Beaudry, Césaire Meh
Over the last few decades, real interest rates have trended downward. The most common explanation is that this reflects depressed demand due to demographic, technological and other real factors. We explore the claim that these trends may have been amplified by certain features of monetary policy.

Optimal Monetary and Macroprudential Policies

Staff Working Paper 2021-21 Josef Schroth
Macroprudential policy should aim for bank balance sheets that are larger and safer during normal times but smaller and riskier during financial crises. During recoveries from financial crises, monetary policy should complement macroprudential policy by being less expansive than what would be required to close the labour gap.

Adoption of Digital Technologies: Insights from a Global Survey Initiative

Staff Discussion Paper 2021-7 James Fudurich, Lena Suchanek, Lise Pichette
Firms are at the forefront of adopting new technology. Using survey data from a global network of central banks, we assess the effects of digitalization on firms’ pricing and employment decisions.
Content Type(s): Staff research, Staff discussion papers Topic(s): Firm dynamics, Inflation and prices, Labour markets JEL Code(s): D, D2, D22, E, E3, E31, J, J2, J21, O, O3, O33

How Long is Forever in the Laboratory? Three Implementations of an Infinite-Horizon Monetary Economy

Staff Working Paper 2021-16 Janet Hua Jiang, Daniela Puzzello, Cathy Zhang
Standard monetary models adopt an infinite horizon with discounting. Testing these models in the lab requires implementing this horizon within a limited time frame. We compare three approaches to such an implementation and discuss their relative advantages.

The Determinants of Consumers’ Inflation Expectations: Evidence from the US and Canada

Staff Working Paper 2020-52 Charles Bellemare, Rolande Kpekou Tossou, Kevin Moran
We compare the determinants of consumer inflation expectations in the US and Canada by analyzing two current surveys. We find that Canadian consumers rely more on professional forecasts and the history of actual inflation when forming their expectations, while US consumers rely more on their own lagged expectations.

Has the Inflation Process Changed? Selective Review of Recent Research on Inflation Dynamics

Staff Discussion Paper 2020-11 Oleksiy Kryvtsov, James (Jim) C. MacGee
From 2011 to 2019, inflation in Canada and advanced economies usually registered below inflation targets, spurring the debate on whether the inflation process has changed. This paper highlights emerging questions that will influence the conduct of monetary policy in Canada in the near term.

Understanding Trend Inflation Through the Lens of the Goods and Services Sectors

Staff Working Paper 2020-45 Yunjong Eo, Luis Uzeda, Benjamin Wong
The goods and services sectors have experienced considerably different dynamics over the past three decades. Our goal in this paper is to understand how such contrasting behaviors at the sectoral level affect the aggregate level of trend inflation dynamics.

What do high-frequency expenditure network data reveal about spending and inflation during COVID‑19?

Staff Analytical Note 2020-20 Kim Huynh, Helen Lao, Patrick Sabourin, Angelika Welte
The official consumer price index (CPI) inflation measure, based on a fixed basket set before the COVID 19 pandemic, may not fully reflect what consumers are currently experiencing. We partnered with Statistics Canada to construct a more representative index for the pandemic with weights based on real-time transaction and survey data.