Research

High-quality, innovative research underpins everything we do. Find out about the Bank’s current research priorities, explore the broad range of staff research that our people have the intellectual freedom to pursue, and learn about the ways in which the Bank supports and collaborates with the external research community. You can also browse our research and subscribe to our monthly research newsletter and latest research feed.

Research priorities

Guided by the Bank’s medium-term plan and shaped by the policy environment, the Bank dedicates significant effort and resources to a range of annual and multi-year research priorities.

The Bank’s Medium‐term Research Plan, 2019–21

Increasing the relevance and visibility of Bank research

Digital Currencies and Fintech

Digital currencies and fintech

Learn more about our ongoing work on digital currencies. This includes research on a Canadian central bank digital currency (CBDC) and on financial technology (fintech).

Toward 2021

Toward 2021

Reviewing the Monetary Policy Framework.

Staff research

Staff research is produced independently from the Bank’s Governing Council. This research may support or challenge prevailing policy orthodoxy or differ from official Bank views. Therefore, views expressed are solely those of the authors, and no responsibility for them should be attributed to the Bank.

Staff analytical notes

Staff analytical notes are short articles that focus on topical issues relevant to the current economic and financial context.

Author list

Listing of current and past authors of Bank research papers, articles and other publications, 1994 to present.

Staff working papers

Staff working papers provide a forum for staff to publish work-in-progress research intended for journal publication.

Our People

Profiles of the Bank’s economic research staff, featuring sections on their publications, education, and research interests.

Staff discussion papers

Staff discussion papers are completed staff research studies on a wide variety of subjects relevant to central bank policy.

Research Newsletter

Subscribe to our monthly newsletter summarizing internal and external publication contributions by Bank of Canada researchers.

Collaboration

Financial System Research Centre

The FSRC promotes financial system research in Canada to inform policy and improve the economic and financial well-being of Canadians.

Visiting Scholar Program

This program provides outstanding scholars with an opportunity to work at the Bank of Canada.

Conferences, seminars and workshops

Papers and proceedings from Bank of Canada conferences, seminars, and workshops

Partnerships in Innovation and Technology (PIVOT) Program

We’re looking for innovators to help us respond to challenges that may not have a commercial solution readily available.

Awards

Research paper awards

At the Bank of Canada, we’re pleased to offer awards for research papers by students and by staff.

Scholarship awards

The Bank of Canada’s Scholarship and Work Placement program is designed to assist students with disabilities and Indigenous students in furthering their education and to encourage them to take an interest in the work performed by the Bank of Canada.

Fellowship Program

Learn more about a program to foster excellence in research in Canada and develop partnerships with experts outside the Bank of Canada in areas important to the Bank’s mandate.

The Governor's Challenge

The Governor’s Challenge simulates the monetary policy decision-making process by putting students in the role of advisor to the Bank’s Governing Council.

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Latest research

Harnessing the benefit of state-contingent forward guidance

Staff Analytical Note 2022-13 Vivian Chu, Yang Zhang
A low level of the neutral rate of interest increases the likelihood that a central bank’s policy rate will reach its effective lower bound (ELB) in future economic downturns. In a low neutral rate environment, using an extended monetary policy toolkit including forward guidance helps address the ELB challenge. Using the Bank’s Terms-of-Trade Economic Model, we assess the benefits and limitations of a state-contingent forward guidance implemented within a flexible inflation targeting framework.

Behavioral Learning Equilibria in New Keynesian Models

Staff Working Paper 2022-42 Cars Hommes, Kostas Mavromatis, Tolga Özden, Mei Zhu
We introduce behavioral learning equilibria (BLE) into DSGE models with boundedly rational agents using simple but optimal first order autoregressive forecasting rules. The Smets-Wouters DSGE model with BLE is estimated and fits well with inflation survey expectations. As a policy application, we show that learning requires a lower degree of interest rate smoothing.

How does the Bank of Canada’s balance sheet impact the banking system?

Staff Analytical Note 2022-12 Daniel Bolduc, Brad Howell, Grahame Johnson
We examine how changes in the Bank of Canada’s balance sheet impact the banking system. Quantitative easing contributed to an increase in the size of the banking system’s balance sheet and an improvement in bank liquidity coverage ratios. Quantitative tightening is expected to partially reverse these impacts. The banking system will have to adjust its liquidity management strategy in response.

Looking Through Supply Shocks versus Controlling Inflation Expectations: Understanding the Central Bank Dilemma

Staff Working Paper 2022-41 Paul Beaudry, Thomas J. Carter, Amartya Lahiri
Why might central banks want to look through supply-driven inflation sometimes and pivot away at other times? When does a change in monetary policy stance help anchor expectations? In this paper we present a simple environment that helps clarify these issues by offering an optimal policy perspective on recent central bank behaviour.

Calculating Effective Degrees of Freedom for Forecast Combinations and Ensemble Models

Staff Discussion Paper 2022-19 James Younker
This paper derives a calculation for the effective degrees of freedom of a forecast combination under a set of general conditions for linear models. Computing effective degrees of freedom shows that the complexity cost of a forecast combination is driven by the parameters in the weighting scheme and the weighted average of parameters in the auxiliary models.
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