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The Efficiency of Private E-Money-Like Systems: The U.S. Experience with National Bank Notes

Staff Working Paper 2015-3 Warren E. Weber
Beginning in 1864, in the United States notes of national banks were the predominant medium of exchange. Each national bank issued its own notes. E-money shares many of the characteristics of these bank notes.

The Role of Card Acceptance in the Transaction Demand for Money

Staff Working Paper 2014-44 Kim Huynh, Philipp Schmidt-Dengler, Helmut Stix
The use of payment cards, either debit or credit, is becoming more and more widespread in developed economies. Nevertheless, the use of cash remains significant.

Retail Payment Innovations and Cash Usage: Accounting for Attrition Using Refreshment Samples

Staff Working Paper 2014-27 Heng Chen, Marie-Hélène Felt, Kim Huynh
We exploit the panel dimension of the Canadian Financial Monitor (CFM) data to estimate the impact of retail payment innovations on cash usage. We estimate a semiparametric panel data model that accounts for unobserved heterogeneity and allows for general forms of non-random attrition.

Understanding the Cash Demand Puzzle

Staff Working Paper 2014-22 Janet Hua Jiang, Enchuan Shao
We develop a model to explain a puzzling trend in cash demand in recent years: the value of bank notes in circulation as a percentage of GDP has remained stable despite decreasing cash usage at points of sale owing to competition from alternative means of payment such as credit cards.

Consumer Cash Usage: A Cross-Country Comparison with Payment Diary Survey Data

We measure consumers’ use of cash by harmonizing payment diary surveys from seven countries. The seven diary surveys were conducted in 2009 (Canada), 2010 (Australia), 2011 (Austria, France, Germany and the Netherlands), and 2012 (the United States).
May 13, 2014

Understanding Platform-Based Digital Currencies

Given technological advances and the widespread use of the Internet, various digital currencies have emerged. In most cases, Internet platforms such as Facebook and Amazon restrict the functionality of their digital currencies to enhance the business model and maximize their profits. While platform-based digital currencies could increase the efficiency of retail payments, they could also raise some important policy issues if they were to become widely used outside of the platform. Thus, it is important to closely monitor the evolution of these digital currencies.

E-Money: Efficiency, Stability and Optimal Policy

Staff Working Paper 2014-16 Jonathan Chiu, Tsz-Nga Wong
What makes e-money more special than cash? Is the introduction of e-money necessarily welfare enhancing? Is an e-money system necessarily stable? What is the optimal way to design an efficient and stable e-money scheme?

The Efficiency of Private E-Money-Like Systems: The U.S. Experience with State Bank Notes

Staff Working Paper 2014-15 Warren E. Weber
In the United States prior to 1863 each bank issued its own distinct notes. E-money shares many of the characteristics of these bank notes. This paper describes some lessons relevant to e-money from the U.S. experience with state bank notes.

Electronic Money and Payments: Recent Developments and Issues

Staff Discussion Paper 2014-2 Ben Fung, Miguel Molico, Gerald Stuber
The authors review recent developments in retail payments in Canada and elsewhere, with a focus on e-money products, and assess their potential public policy implications.
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