Marie-Hélène Felt

Senior Economist

Marie-Hélène is a Senior Economist. Her primary area of research is applied microeconometrics. In the field of retail payments, she conducts research evaluating the impact of payment innovations on cash usage.

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Senior Economist
Currency
Economic Research and Analysis

Bank of Canada
234 Wellington Street
Ottawa, ON, K1A 0G9

Latest

2017 Methods-of-Payment Survey: Sample Calibration and Variance Estimation

Technical Report No. 114 Heng Chen, Marie-Hélène Felt, Christopher Henry
This technical report describes sampling, weighting and variance estimation for the Bank of Canada’s 2017 Methods-of-Payment Survey. Under quota sampling, a raking ratio method is implemented to generate weights with both post-stratification and nonparametric nonresponse weight adjustments.
Content Type(s): Technical Reports Topic(s): Econometric and statistical methods JEL Code(s): C, C8, C81, C83

A Look Inside the Box: Combining Aggregate and Marginal Distributions to Identify Joint Distributions

Staff Working Paper 2018-29 Marie-Hélène Felt
This paper proposes a method for estimating the joint distribution of two or more variables when only their marginal distributions and the distribution of their aggregates are observed. Nonparametric identification is achieved by modelling dependence using a latent common-factor structure.

The Costs of Point-of-Sale Payments in Canada

Using data from our 2014 cost-of-payments survey, we calculate resource costs for cash, debit cards and credit cards. For each payment method, we examine the total cost incurred by consumers, retailers, financial institutions and infrastructures, the Royal Canadian Mint and the Bank of Canada.

Retail Payment Innovations and Cash Usage: Accounting for Attrition Using Refreshment Samples

Staff Working Paper 2014-27 Heng Chen, Marie-Hélène Felt, Kim Huynh
We exploit the panel dimension of the Canadian Financial Monitor (CFM) data to estimate the impact of retail payment innovations on cash usage. We estimate a semiparametric panel data model that accounts for unobserved heterogeneity and allows for general forms of non-random attrition.

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