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88 Results

Should Bank Capital Regulation Be Risk Sensitive?

Staff Working Paper 2018-48 Toni Ahnert, James Chapman, Carolyn A. Wilkins
We present a simple model to study the risk sensitivity of capital regulation. A banker funds investment with uninsured deposits and costly capital, where capital resolves a moral hazard problem in the banker’s choice of risk.

Prudential Liquidity Regulation in Banking—A Literature Review

Staff Discussion Paper 2018-8 Adi Mordel
Prudential liquidity requirements are a relatively recent regulatory tool on the international front, introduced as part of the Basel III accord in the form of a liquidity coverage ratio (LCR) and a net stable funding ratio (NSFR). I first discuss the rationale for regulating bank liquidity by highlighting the market failures that it addresses while reviewing key theoretical contributions to the literature on the motivation for prudential liquidity regulation.

The Characteristics of Uninsured Mortgages and their Securitization Potential

Staff Analytical Note 2018-24 Adi Mordel, Maria teNyenhuis
Following changes to housing finance policies that target insured mortgages, uninsured mortgage credit has been growing. This robust growth creates a larger pool of mortgages that may be suitable for private-label residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS).
June 7, 2018

The Bank of Canada’s Financial System Survey

This report presents the details of a new semi-annual survey that will improve the Bank of Canada’s surveillance across the financial system and deepen efforts to engage with financial system participants. The survey collects expert opinions on the risks to and resilience of the Canadian financial system as well as on emerging trends and financial innovations. The report presents an overview of the survey and provides high-level results from the spring 2018 survey.
June 7, 2018

Covered Bonds as a Source of Funding for Banks’ Mortgage Portfolios

The author traces developments in the Canadian covered bond market. Covered bonds could be a valuable way to provide a stable and diverse source of funding, particularly for smaller banks. However, higher issuance could increase banks’ vulnerability to liquidity stress, with implications for the broader financial system. The author argues that these benefits and challenges can be balanced in a well-designed policy framework.
June 7, 2018

Establishing a Resolution Regime for Canada’s Financial Market Infrastructures

This report highlights how an effective resolution regime promotes financial stability. It does this by ensuring that financial market infrastructures (FMIs) would be able to continue to provide their critical functions during a period of stress when an FMI’s own recovery measures were failing. The report explains the Bank of Canada’s new role as the resolution authority for FMIs, which will further bolster financial system resilience.

Interest Rate and Renewal Risk for Mortgages

Staff Analytical Note 2018-18 Olga Bilyk, Cameron MacDonald, Brian Peterson
In this note, we explore two types of risk faced by holders of mortgages and home equity lines of credit (HELOCs) in the context of rising interest rates: interest rate risk and renewal risk.

Analysis of Asymmetric GARCH Volatility Models with Applications to Margin Measurement

Staff Working Paper 2018-21 Elena Goldman, Xiangjin Shen
We explore properties of asymmetric generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (GARCH) models in the threshold GARCH (GTARCH) family and propose a more general Spline-GTARCH model, which captures high-frequency return volatility, low-frequency macroeconomic volatility as well as an asymmetric response to past negative news in both autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARCH) and GARCH terms.

The “Too Big to Fail” Subsidy in Canada: Some Estimates

Staff Working Paper 2018-9 Patricia Palhau Mora
Implicit government guarantees of banking-sector liabilities reduce market discipline by private sector stakeholders and temper the risk sensitivity of funding costs. This potentially increases the likelihood of bailouts from taxpayers, especially in the absence of effective resolution frameworks.

Who Pays? CCP Resource Provision in the Post-Pittsburgh World

Staff Discussion Paper 2017-17 Jorge Cruz Lopez, Mark Manning
At the Pittsburgh Summit in 2009, G20 countries announced their commitment to clear all standardized over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives through central counterparties (CCPs). Since then, CCPs have become increasingly important and there has been an extensive program of regulatory enhancements to both them and OTC derivatives markets.
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