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22 Results

International Banking and Cross-Border Effects of Regulation: Lessons from Canada

Staff Working Paper 2016-34 H. Evren Damar, Adi Mordel
We study how changes in prudential requirements affect cross-border lending of Canadian banks by utilizing an index that aggregates adjustments in key regulatory instruments across jurisdictions.

Government Corruption and Foreign Direct Investment Under the Threat of Expropriation

Staff Working Paper 2016-13 Christopher Hajzler, Jonathan Rosborough
Foreign investment is often constrained by two forms of political risk: expropriation and corruption. We examine the role of government corruption in foreign direct investment (FDI) when contracts are not fully transparent and investors face the threat of expropriation.

Database of Sovereign Defaults, 2017

Technical Report No. 101 David Beers, Jamshid Mavalwalla
Until recently, there have been few efforts to systematically measure and aggregate the nominal value of the different types of sovereign government debt in default. To help fill this gap, the Bank of Canada’s Credit Rating Assessment Group (CRAG) has developed a comprehensive database of sovereign defaults posted on the Bank of Canada’s website.

Sovereign Default and State-Contingent Debt

Staff Discussion Paper 2013-3 Martin Brooke, Rhys R. Mendes, Alex Pienkowski, Eric Santor
The Latin American debt crises in the 1980s and the Asian crisis in the late 1990s both provided impetus for reforming the framework for restructuring sovereign debt. In the late 1980s, the Brady plan established the importance of substantive debt relief in addressing some crises.

Composition of International Capital Flows: A Survey

Staff Working Paper 2010-33 Koralai Kirabaeva, Assaf Razin
We survey several key mechanisms that explain the composition of international capital flows: foreign direct investment, foreign portfolio investment and debt flows (bank loans and bonds). In particular, we focus on the following market frictions: asymmetric information in capital markets and exposure to liquidity shocks.
Content Type(s): Staff research, Staff working papers Topic(s): International topics JEL Code(s): D, D8, D82, F, F2, F21, F3, F34

International Capital Flows and Bond Risk Premia

Staff Working Paper 2010-14 Jesus Sierra
This paper studies the impact of international capital flows on asset prices through risk premia. We investigate whether foreign purchases of U.S. Treasury securities significantly contributed to the decline in excess returns on long-term bonds between 1995 and 2008.
Content Type(s): Staff research, Staff working papers Topic(s): Financial markets JEL Code(s): C, C2, C22, F, F3, F31, F32, F34, G, G1, G11, G12, G15

How Important Is Liquidity Risk for Sovereign Bond Risk Premia? Evidence from the London Stock Exchange

Staff Working Paper 2008-47 Ron Alquist
This paper uses the framework of arbitrage-pricing theory to study the relationship between liquidity risk and sovereign bond risk premia. The London Stock Exchange in the late 19th century is an ideal laboratory in which to test the proposition that liquidity risk affects the price of sovereign debt.
Content Type(s): Staff research, Staff working papers Topic(s): Financial markets, International topics JEL Code(s): F, F2, F21, F3, F34, F36, G, G1, G12, G15

Good Policies or Good Fortune: What Drives the Compression in Emerging Market Spreads?

Staff Working Paper 2008-25 Philipp Maier, Garima Vasishtha
Since 2002, spreads on emerging market sovereign debt have fallen to historical lows. Given the close links between sovereign spreads, capital flows to emerging markets, and economic growth, understanding the factors driving these spreads is very important. We address this issue in two stages.

IMF-Supported Adjustment Programs: Welfare Implications and the Catalytic Effect

Staff Working Paper 2007-22 Carlos De Resende
The author studies the welfare implications of adjustment programs supported by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). He uses a model where an endogenous borrowing constraint, set up by international lenders who will never lend more than a debt ceiling, forces the borrowing economy to always choose repayment over default.
Content Type(s): Staff research, Staff working papers Topic(s): International topics JEL Code(s): F, F3, F32, F33, F34, F4, F41
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