Teodora Paligorova

RSS

Show all

Staff Working Papers

Cross-Border Bank Flows and Monetary Policy: Implications for Canada

Using the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) Locational Banking Statistics data on bilateral bank claims from 1995 to 2014, we analyze the impact of monetary policy on cross-border bank flows. We find that monetary policy in a source country is an important determinant of cross-border bank flows.
Content Type(s): Staff Research, Staff Working Papers Topic(s): Financial institutions, Monetary policy JEL Code(s): F, F3, F34, F36, G, G0, G01

Non-Bank Investors and Loan Renegotiations

Staff Working Paper 2016-60 Teodora Paligorova, João Santos
We document that the structure of syndicates affects loan renegotiations. Lead banks with large retained shares have positive effects on renegotiations. In contrast, more diverse syndicates deter renegotiations, but only for credit lines.

Rollover Risk and the Maturity Transformation Function of Banks

Staff Working Paper 2014-8 Teodora Paligorova, João Santos
This paper shows that banks that rely heavily on short-term funding engage less in maturity transformation in an attempt to decrease their exposure to rollover risk. These banks shorten both the maturity of their portfolio of loans as well as the maturity of newly issued loans. We find that the loan yield curve becomes steeper with banks’ increasing use of short-term funding.
Content Type(s): Staff Research, Staff Working Papers Topic(s): Financial stability JEL Code(s): G, G2, G21

Corporate Governance, Product Market Competition and Debt Financing

Staff Working Paper 2014-5 Teodora Paligorova, Jun Yang
This paper examines the impact of product market competition and corporate governance on the cost of debt financing and the use of bond covenants. We find that more anti-takeover provisions are associated with a lower cost of debt only in competitive industries.
Content Type(s): Staff Research, Staff Working Papers Topic(s): Financial markets JEL Code(s): G, G1, G12, G3, G34

When Is It Less Costly for Risky Firms to Borrow? Evidence from the Bank Risk- Taking Channel of Monetary Policy

Staff Working Paper 2012-10 Teodora Paligorova, João Santos
In an investigation of banks’ loan pricing policies in the United States over the past two decades, this study finds supporting evidence for the bank risk-taking channel of monetary policy. We show that banks charge lower spreads when they lend to riskier borrowers relative to the spreads they charge on loans to safer borrowers in periods of low short-term rates compared to periods of high short-term rates.

See More


Bank Publications

Bank of Canada Review Article

November 13, 2014

The Use of Financial Derivatives by Canadian Firms

In Canada, about one-third of publicly listed non-financial firms use financial derivatives. The use of derivatives is widespread across all sectors of the economy and increases during periods of greater uncertainty. Non-financial firms that use derivatives are typically larger and more profitable and have lower volatility of earnings than those that do not use derivatives. Overall, the firm characteristics of Canadian hedgers seem to be consistent with those found in other jurisdictions.
Content Type(s): Publications, Bank of Canada Review Article Topic(s): Exchange rates, Financial markets JEL Code(s): G, G1, G10, G3, G32
November 15, 2012

Monetary Policy and the Risk-Taking Channel: Insights from the Lending Behaviour of Banks

The financial crisis of 2007-09 and the subsequent extended period of historically low real interest rates have revived the question of whether economic agents are willing to take on more risk when interest rates remain low for a prolonged time period. This increased appetite for risk, which causes economic agents to search for investment assets and strategies that generate higher investment returns, has been called the risk-taking channel of monetary policy. Recent academic research on banks suggests that lending policies in times of low interest rates can be consistent with the existence of a risk-taking channel of monetary policy in Europe, South America, the United States and Canada. Specifically, studies find that the terms of loans to risky borrowers become less stringent in periods of low interest rates. This risk-taking channel may amplify the effects of traditional transmission mechanisms, resulting in the creation of excessive credit.

September 11, 2009

Agency Conflicts in the Process of Securitization

Recent evidence finds a positive association between the prevalence of loans of inferior quality and the growth in securitized products. Some attribute this development to the lack of incentives for originators to screen and monitor the performance of securitized loans; others stress that certain factors, such as balance-sheet management, also contributed to the problem, making it difficult to pin down the reason for the proliferation of such loans during the period of high securitization growth. The author reviews the conflicts of interest between participants in the securitization process that contributed to the ongoing financial turmoil and highlights the most recent policy measures and potential solutions for ameliorating these agency issues.

See More