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8646 Results

The Zero Bound on Nominal Interest Rates: How Important Is It?

Staff Working Paper 2001-6 David Amirault, Brian O'Reilly
This paper surveys the literature on the zero bound on the nominal interest rate. It addresses questions ranging from the conditions under which the zero bound on the nominal interest rate might occur to policy options to avoid or use to exit from such a situation. We discuss literature that examines historical and country evidence, and literature that uses models to generate evidence on this question.

Reactions of Canadian Interest Rates to Macroeconomic Announcements: Implications for Monetary Policy Transparency

Staff Working Paper 2001-5 Toni Gravelle, Richhild Moessner
In this study we statistically quantify the reactions of Canadian and U.S. interest rates to macroeconomic announcements released in Canada and in the United States. We find that Canadian interest rates react very little to Canadian macroeconomic news and are significantly affected by U.S. macroeconomic news, which indicates that international influences on the Canadian fixed-income markets are important.

On the Nature and the Stability of the Canadian Phillips Curve

Staff Working Paper 2001-4 Maral Kichian
This paper empirically determines why, during the 1990s, inflation in Canada was consistently more stable than predicted by the fixed-coefficients Phillips curve. A time-varying-coefficient model, where all the parameters adjust simultaneously, shows that the behaviour of expectations was probably a major contributing factor.
March 28, 2001

Opening Statement before the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce

Opening statement David Dodge Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce
On this occasion, I would like to touch on the Bank's contribution to good economic performance, our emphasis on openness and transparency, and our role in promoting domestic and global financial stability. I will then comment on the Bank's view of current economic conditions and discuss any issues you may wish to raise.
March 20, 2001

Governor highlights Bank of Canada's contribution to domestic and global financial stability

As an open economy, Canada has a strong interest in promoting a sound and robust international economic environment, Governor David Dodge said today, in a speech to the Montreal Society of Financial Analysts. He stressed that sound macroeconomic policies and robust and efficient financial systems are of paramount importance in an increasingly interconnected world.
Content Type(s): Press, Press releases
March 20, 2001

The Bank of Canada and Financial Stability

Remarks David Dodge Montreal Society of Financial Analysts Montréal, Quebec
While monetary stability through low inflation is crucial to good economic performance, our economy cannot function properly unless it is also supported by an efficient and stable financial system. And as the world economy becomes increasingly interconnected, sound macroeconomic policies and sound financial systems across all countries are even more essential.

On Commodity-Sensitive Currencies and Inflation Targeting

Staff Working Paper 2001-3 Kevin Clinton
Two aspects of the recent monetary history of Canada, Australia, and New Zealand stand out: the sensitivity of their dollars to prices of resource-based commodities, and inflation targeting. This paper explores various aspects of these phenomena.
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