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57 Results

Government of Canada Fixed-Income Market Ecology

Staff Discussion Paper 2018-10 Léanne Berger-Soucy, Corey Garriott, André Usche

This discussion paper is the third in the Financial Markets Department’s series on the structure of Canadian financial markets. These papers are called “ecologies” because they study the interactions among market participants, infrastructures, regulations and the terms of the traded contract itself.

The BoC-BoE Sovereign Default Database Revisited: What’s New in 2018?

Staff Working Paper 2018-30 David Beers, Jamshid Mavalwalla
Until recently, there have been few efforts to systematically measure and aggregate the nominal value of the different types of sovereign government debt in default. To help fill this gap, the Bank of Canada’s Credit Rating Assessment Group (CRAG) has developed a comprehensive database of sovereign defaults posted on the Bank of Canada’s website that now is updated in partnership with the Bank of England.
June 7, 2018

Establishing a Resolution Regime for Canada’s Financial Market Infrastructures

This report highlights how an effective resolution regime promotes financial stability. It does this by ensuring that financial market infrastructures (FMIs) would be able to continue to provide their critical functions during a period of stress when an FMI’s own recovery measures were failing. The report explains the Bank of Canada’s new role as the resolution authority for FMIs, which will further bolster financial system resilience.

Adverse Selection with Heterogeneously Informed Agents

Staff Working Paper 2018-7 Mohammad Davoodalhosseini
A model of over-the-counter markets is proposed. Some asset buyers are informed in that they can identify high quality assets. Heterogeneous sellers with private information choose what type of buyers they want to trade with.

Complementing the Credit Risk Assessment of Financial Counterparties with Market-Based Indicators

Staff Analytical Note 2017-15 Guillaume Ouellet Leblanc, Maarten van Oordt
The Bank’s internal credit risk assessment abilities are regularly enhanced. In this note, we present a recent innovation that extends the set of market-based indicators used in the credit risk assessment of financial counterparties.
June 8, 2017

Using Market-Based Indicators to Assess Banking System Resilience

This report reviews the use of quantitative tools to gauge market participants’ assessment of banking system resilience. These measures complement traditional balance-sheet metrics and suggest that markets consider large Canadian banks to be better placed to weather adverse shocks than banks in other advanced economies. Compared with regulatory capital ratios, however, the measures suggest less improvement in banking system resilience since the pre-crisis period.
May 11, 2017

Wholesale Funding of the Big Six Canadian Banks

The Big Six Canadian banks are a dominant component of the Canadian financial system. How they finance their business activities is fundamental to how effective they are. Retail and commercial deposits along with wholesale funding represent the two major sources of funds for Canadian banks. What wholesale funding instruments do the Big Six banks use? How do they choose between different funding sources, funding strategies and why? How have banks changed their funding mix since the 2007–09 global financial crisis?

Repo Market Functioning when the Interest Rate Is Low or Negative

Staff Discussion Paper 2017-3 Jean-Sébastien Fontaine, James Hately, Adrian Walton
This paper investigates how a low or negative overnight interest rate might affect the Canadian repo markets. The main conclusion is that the repo market for general collateral will continue to function effectively.

Are Counterparty Arrangements in Reinsurance a Threat to Financial Stability?

Staff Working Paper 2016-39 Matt Davison, Darrell Leadbetter, Bin Lu, Jane Voll
Interconnectedness among insurers and reinsurers at a global level is not well understood and may pose a significant risk to the sector, with implications for the macroeconomy. Models of the complex interactions among reinsurers and with other participants in the financial system and the real economy are at a very early stage of development.
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