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106 Results

Identification and Estimation of Risk Aversion in First-Price Auctions with Unobserved Auction Heterogeneity

Staff Working Paper 2016-23 Serafin Grundl, Yu Zhu
This paper shows point identification in first-price auction models with risk aversion and unobserved auction heterogeneity by exploiting multiple bids from each auction and variation in the number of bidders. The required exclusion restriction is shown to be consistent with a large class of entry models.
Content Type(s): Staff research, Staff working papers Topic(s): Econometric and statistical methods JEL Code(s): C, C1, C14, C5, C57, D, D4, D44, L, L0, L00

Estimating Systematic Risk Under Extremely Adverse Market Conditions

Staff Working Paper 2016-22 Maarten van Oordt, Chen Zhou
This paper considers the problem of estimating a linear model between two heavy-tailed variables if the explanatory variable has an extremely low (or high) value. We propose an estimator for the model coefficient by exploiting the tail dependence between the two variables and prove its asymptotic properties.

Early Warning of Financial Stress Events: A Credit-Regime-Switching Approach

Staff Working Paper 2016-21 Fuchun Li, Hongyu Xiao
We propose an early warning model for predicting the likelihood of a financial stress event for a given future time, and examine whether credit plays an important role in the model as a non-linear propagator of shocks.

Understanding Firms' Inflation Expectations Using the Bank of Canada's Business Outlook Survey

Staff Working Paper 2016-7 Simon Richards, Matthieu Verstraete
Inflation expectations are a key determinant of actual and future inflation and thus matter for the conduct of monetary policy. We study how firms form their inflation expectations using quarterly firm-level data from the Bank of Canada’s Business Outlook Survey, spanning the 2001 to 2015 period.

New Housing Registrations as a Leading Indicator of the BC Economy

Staff Discussion Paper 2016-3 Calista Cheung, Dmitry Granovsky
Housing starts and building permits data are commonly used as leading indicators of economic activity. In British Columbia, all new homes must be registered with the Homeowner Protection Office, a branch of BC Housing, before the issuance of building permits and the start of construction.

Debt Overhang and Deleveraging in the US Household Sector: Gauging the Impact on Consumption

Staff Working Paper 2015-47 Bruno Albuquerque, Georgi Krustev
Using a novel dataset for the US states, this paper examines whether household debt and the protracted debt deleveraging help explain the dismal performance of US consumption since 2007, in the aftermath of the housing bubble.

Testing for the Diffusion Matrix in a Continuous-Time Markov Process Model with Applications to the Term Structure of Interest Rates

Staff Working Paper 2015-17 Fuchun Li
The author proposes a test for the parametric specification of each component in the diffusion matrix of a d-dimensional diffusion process. Overall, d (d-1)/2 test statistics are constructed for the off-diagonal components, while d test statistics are constructed for the main diagonal components.

Bootstrap Tests of Mean-Variance Efficiency with Multiple Portfolio Groupings

Staff Working Paper 2014-51 Sermin Gungor, Richard Luger
We propose double bootstrap methods to test the mean-variance efficiency hypothesis when multiple portfolio groupings of the test assets are considered jointly rather than individually.

Predicting Financial Stress Events: A Signal Extraction Approach

Staff Working Paper 2014-37 Ian Christensen, Fuchun Li
The objective of this paper is to propose an early warning system that can predict the likelihood of the occurrence of financial stress events within a given period of time. To achieve this goal, the signal extraction approach proposed by Kaminsky, Lizondo and Reinhart (1998) is used to monitor the evolution of a number of economic indicators that tend to exhibit an unusual behaviour in the periods preceding a financial stress event.
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