Reinhard Ellwanger

Senior Economist

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Reinhard Ellwanger

Senior Economist

Bank of Canada
234 Wellington Street
Ottawa, ON, K1A 0G9

Latest

The Simple Economics of Global Fuel Consumption

Staff Working Paper 2019-35 Doga Bilgin, Reinhard Ellwanger
This paper presents a structural framework of the global oil market that relies on information on global fuel consumption to identify flow demand for oil. We show that under mild identifying assumptions, data on global fuel consumption help to provide comparatively sharp insights on elasticities and other key structural parameters of the global oil market.
Content Type(s): Staff Research, Staff Working Papers Topic(s): Economic models JEL Code(s): C, C5, C51, L, L7, L71, Q, Q4, Q41, Q43

A Structural Model of the Global Oil Market

Staff Analytical Note 2019-17 Reinhard Ellwanger
This note presents a structural vector autoregressive (SVAR) model of the global oil market. The model identifies four types of shocks with different economic interpretations: oil supply shocks, oil-market-specific demand shocks, storage demand shocks and shocks to global economic growth.
Content Type(s): Staff Research, Staff Analytical Notes Topic(s): Economic models JEL Code(s): Q, Q4, Q41, Q43

On the Tail Risk Premium in the Oil Market

Staff Working Paper 2017-46 Reinhard Ellwanger
This paper shows that changes in market participants’ fear of rare events implied by crude oil options contribute to oil price volatility and oil return predictability. Using 25 years of historical data, we document economically large tail risk premia that vary substantially over time and significantly forecast crude oil futures and spot returns.
November 16, 2017

Factors Behind the 2014 Oil Price Decline

Oil prices have declined sharply over the past three years. While both supply and demand factors played a role in the large oil price decline of 2014, global supply growth seems to have been the predominant force. The most important drivers were likely the surprising growth of US shale oil production, the output decisions of the Organization of the Petro-leum Exporting Countries and the weaker-than-expected global growth that followed the 2009 global financial crisis.

A Dynamic Factor Model for Commodity Prices

Staff Analytical Note 2017-12 Doga Bilgin, Reinhard Ellwanger
In this note, we present the Commodities Factor Model (CFM), a dynamic factor model for a large cross-section of energy and non-energy commodity prices. The model decomposes price changes in commodities into a common “global” component, a “block” component confined to subgroups of economically related commodities and an idiosyncratic price shock component.

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