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330 Results

Climate Variability and International Trade

Staff Working Paper 2023-8 Geoffrey R. Dunbar, Walter Steingress, Ben Tomlin
This paper quantifies the impact of hurricanes on seaborne international trade to the United States. Matching the timing of hurricane–trade route intersections with monthly U.S. port-level trade data, we isolate the unanticipated effects of a hurricane hitting a trade route using two separate identification schemes: an event study and a local projection.
Content Type(s): Staff research, Staff working papers Topic(s): Climate change, International topics JEL Code(s): C, C2, C22, C5, F, F1, F14, F18, Q, Q5, Q54

Stress Relief? Funding Structures and Resilience to the Covid Shock

Staff Working Paper 2023-7 Kristin Forbes, Christian Friedrich, Dennis Reinhardt
Funding structures affected the amount of financial stress different countries and sectors experienced during the spread of COVID-19 in early 2020. Policy responses targeting specific vulnerabilities were more effective at mitigating this stress than those supporting banks or the economy more broadly.
December 12, 2022

Putting the resolute in resolutions: Looking ahead to lower inflation

Remarks Tiff Macklem Business Council of British Columbia Vancouver, British Columbia
Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem discusses the important lessons from 2022 and explains what the Bank is doing to restore price stability for Canadians.
December 12, 2022

Reflections on 2022

Speech summary Tiff Macklem Business Council of British Columbia Vancouver, British Columbia
Governor Tiff Macklem discusses the important lessons from events in 2022 and what the Bank is doing to restore price stability for Canadians.

Stagflation and Topsy-Turvy Capital Flows

Staff Working Paper 2022-46 Julien Bengui, Louphou Coulibaly
Unregulated capital flows are likely excessive during a stagflation episode, owing to a macroeconomic externality operating through the economy’s supply side. Inflows raise domestic wages and cause unwelcome upward pressure on firm costs, yet market forces likely generate such inflows. Optimal capital flow management instead requires net outflows.

Fiscal Policy in the Age of COVID-19: Does It “Get in All of the Cracks”?

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an atypical recession in which some sectors of the economy boomed and others collapsed. This required a unique fiscal policy reaction to both support firms and stimulate activity in sectors with slack. Was fiscal policy able to get where it was needed? Mostly, yes.
September 20, 2022

Macroeconomics of the 2020s: What we’ve learned, and what’s to come

Remarks Paul Beaudry University of Waterloo Faculty of Arts Distinguished Lecture in Economics Waterloo, Ontario
Deputy Governor Paul Beaudry discusses the macroeconomic lessons we’ve learned during the COVID-19 pandemic, and what lies ahead to bring inflation back to target.
September 20, 2022

Anatomy of a pandemic: Applying old lessons and learning from new ones

Speech summary Paul Beaudry University of Waterloo Faculty of Arts Distinguished Lecture in Economics Waterloo, Ontario
Deputy Governor Paul Beaudry describes how the lessons learned from previous economic crises helped central bankers during the global COVID-19 pandemic. He also talks about how managing inflation expectations can help bring inflation back to target.

International Transmission of Quantitative Easing Policies: Evidence from Canada

Staff Working Paper 2022-30 Serdar Kabaca, Kerem Tuzcuoglu
This paper examines the cross-border spillovers from major economies’ quantitative easing (QE) policies to their trading partners. We concentrate on spillovers from the US to Canada during the zero lower bound period when QE policies were actively used.

Foreign Exchange Interventions: The Long and the Short of It

Staff Working Paper 2022-25 Patrick Alexander, Sami Alpanda, Serdar Kabaca
This paper studies the effects of foreign exchange (FX) interventions in a two-region model where governments issue both short- and long-term bonds. We find that the term premium channel dominates the trade balance channel in our calibrated model. As a result, the conventional beggar-thy-neighbor effects of interventions are overturned.
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