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8366 Results

January 17, 2022

Business Outlook Survey―Fourth Quarter of 2021

In the fourth-quarter Business Outlook Survey, reports of supply chain bottlenecks and labour shortages remain elevated. Firms cited robust growth in demand, although those offering hard-to-distance services still had sales below pre-pandemic levels, even before the Omicron variant began spreading broadly. These factors are resulting in upward pressures on prices over the next year.
January 17, 2022

Release: Business Outlook Survey and Canadian Survey of Consumer Expectations

10:30 (ET)
The Business Outlook Survey is a summary of interviews conducted by the Bank's regional offices with business leaders from about 100 firms, selected in accordance with the composition of Canada's gross domestic product. The Canadian Survey of Consumer Expectations (CSCE) is a quarterly survey aimed at measuring household views of inflation, the labour market and household finances, as well as topical issues of interest to the Bank of Canada.

Content Type(s): Upcoming events
January 17, 2022

Canadian Survey of Consumer Expectations—Fourth Quarter of 2021

This survey took place in November 2021 before the Omicron variant of COVID-19 began spreading broadly in Canada. In December, the number of COVID-19 cases rose dramatically and governments began to reimpose containment measures. Many Canadians think inflation will be high over the next two years because of supply disruptions caused by the pandemic. They are more concerned about inflation now than they were before the pandemic and believe it has become more difficult to control. However, near-term inflation expectations are not feeding into expectations for wage growth or longer-term inflation. Showing confidence in the labour market, workers are more likely than ever to want to change jobs.

The Financial Origins of Non-fundamental Risk

Staff Working Paper 2022-4 Sushant Acharya, Keshav Dogra, Sanjay Singh
We explore the idea that the financial sector can be a source of non-fundamental risk to the rest of the economy. We also consider whether policy can be used to reduce this risk—either by increasing the supply of publicly backed safe assets or by reducing the demand for safe assets.
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