Alexander Fritsche

Regional Director (Economics)

Alexander Fritsche was appointed Regional Director (Economics) at the Bank's Regional Office for the Prairie Provinces, Nunavut, and the Northwest Territories in June 2009. In this capacity, he directs research and analysis on economic and sectoral developments in the region, including overseeing the Bank's Business Outlook Survey in the region. He also plays a major role in the Office's activities in communicating the Bank's messages to a variety of external audiences and promoting an exchange of views on the economy and monetary policy.

Originally from Lahr, Germany, Mr. Fritsche holds an honours Bachelor of Arts degree in economics (1998), as well as a Master of Arts degree in economics (1999) from the University of Western Ontario. His current research interests include North American energy markets, regional economic forecasts, and the use of the Business Outlook Survey in macroeconomic forecasting.

Mr. Fritsche joined the Bank in January 2009 as a Senior Economist in the Calgary Regional Office. Before joining the Bank, Mr. Fritsche worked at the Conference Board of Canada, where he held a variety of positions in the Economic Forecasting and Analysis department, most recently as Senior Economist. He specialized in regional and industry forecasts, economic impact studies, and model building, as well as public affairs.

Biographical Note: Alexander Fritsche


Alexander Fritsche

Regional Director (Economics)
Canadian Economic Analysis
Regional Analysis

Bank of Canada
308 - 4th Avenue, S.W., Suite 2411
Calgary, AB, T2P 0H7


Extending the Labour Market Indicator to the Canadian Provinces

Staff Discussion Paper 2016-2 Alexander Fritsche, Katherine Ragan
Calculating the labour market indicator (LMI) at the provincial level provides useful insights into Canada’s regional economies and reveals differing trends in the state of underlying labour market conditions across provinces. Conclusions based on the Canadian LMI do not necessarily translate to the provinces. In most cases, the correlations between the provincial LMIs and the underlying labour market variables have the expected sign.

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