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22 Results

BoC–BoE Sovereign Default Database: What’s new in 2021?

Staff Analytical Note 2021-15 David Beers, Elliot Jones, Zacharie Quiviger, John Walsh
The BoC–BoE database of sovereign debt defaults, published and updated annually by the Bank of Canada and the Bank of England, provides comprehensive estimates of stocks of government obligations in default.

BoC-BoE Sovereign Default Database: What’s New in 2020?

Staff Analytical Note 2020-13 David Beers, Elliot Jones, John Walsh
The Boc–BoE database of sovereign debt defaults, published and updated annually by the Bank of Canada and the Bank of England, provides comprehensive estimates of stocks of government obligations in default. The 2020 edition includes a new section examining the scale of domestic arrears in 2018.

BoC–BoE Sovereign Default Database: Methodology, Assumptions and Sources

Technical Report No. 117 David Beers, Elliot Jones, John Walsh
Until recently, few efforts have been made to systematically measure and aggregate the nominal value of the different types of sovereign government debt in default. To help fill this gap, the Bank of Canada (BoC) developed a comprehensive database of sovereign defaults that is posted on its website and updated in partnership with the Bank of England (BoE).

A Macroprudential Theory of Foreign Reserve Accumulation

Staff Working Paper 2019-43 Fernando Arce, Julien Bengui, Javier Bianchi
This paper proposes a theory of foreign reserves as macroprudential policy. We study an open-economy model of financial crises in which pecuniary externalities lead to overborrowing, and show that by accumulating international reserves, the government can achieve the constrained-efficient allocation.

The BoC-BoE Sovereign Default Database: What’s New in 2019?

Staff Working Paper 2019-39 David Beers, Patrisha de Leon-Manlagnit
Until recently, few efforts have been made to systematically measure and aggregate the nominal value of the different types of sovereign government debt in default. To help fill this gap, the Bank of Canada (BoC) developed a comprehensive database of sovereign defaults that is posted on its website and updated in partnership with the Bank of England (BoE).

Macroprudential FX Regulations: Shifting the Snowbanks of FX Vulnerability?

Can macroprudential foreign exchange (FX) regulations on banks reduce the financial and macroeconomic vulnerabilities created by borrowing in foreign currency? To evaluate the effectiveness and unintended consequences of macroprudential FX regulations, we develop a parsimonious model of bank and market lending in domestic and foreign currency and derive four predictions.

Assessing Vulnerabilities in Emerging-Market Economies

Staff Discussion Paper 2018-13 Tatjana Dahlhaus, Alexander Lam
This paper introduces a new tool to monitor economic and financial vulnerabilities in emerging-market economies. We obtain vulnerability indexes for several early warning indicators covering 26 emerging markets from 1990 to 2017 and use them to monitor the evolution of vulnerabilities before, during and after an economic or financial crisis.

The BoC-BoE Sovereign Default Database Revisited: What’s New in 2018?

Staff Working Paper 2018-30 David Beers, Jamshid Mavalwalla
Until recently, there have been few efforts to systematically measure and aggregate the nominal value of the different types of sovereign government debt in default. To help fill this gap, the Bank of Canada’s Credit Rating Assessment Group (CRAG) has developed a comprehensive database of sovereign defaults posted on the Bank of Canada’s website that now is updated in partnership with the Bank of England.

Cross-Border Bank Flows and Monetary Policy: Implications for Canada

Using the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) Locational Banking Statistics data on bilateral bank claims from 1995 to 2014, we analyze the impact of monetary policy on cross-border bank flows. We find that monetary policy in a source country is an important determinant of cross-border bank flows.
Content Type(s): Staff research, Staff working papers Topic(s): Financial institutions, Monetary policy JEL Code(s): F, F3, F34, F36, G, G0, G01
June 8, 2017

Canada’s International Investment Position: Benefits and Potential Vulnerabilities

While greater global financial integration is beneficial, the authors discuss how foreign capital inflows can also facilitate the buildup of domestic vulnerabilities and potentially lead to destabilizing reversals. Canada’s current international investment position is typical of advanced economies and will likely continue to act as an economic stabilizer. However, the growth and composition of Canada’s international investment position warrant continued monitoring.
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