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8604 Results

Liquidity Effects and Market Frictions

Staff Working Paper 1998-11 Scott Hendry, Guang-Jia Zhang
The goal of this paper is to shed light on the nature of the monetary transmission mechanism. Specifically, we attempt to tackle two problems in standard limited-participation models: (1) the interest rate liquidity effect is not as persistent as in the data; and (2) some nominal variables are unrealistically volatile. To address these problems, we […]
Content Type(s): Staff research, Staff working papers Topic(s): Monetary policy transmission JEL Code(s): E, E5

Fundamentals, Contagion and Currency Crises: An Empirical Analysis

Staff Working Paper 1998-10 Mark Kruger, Patrick Osakwe, Jennifer Page
This paper examines the determinants of currency crises in Latin America, Asia and Africa. It asks two basic questions: (a) Are currency crises linked to economic fundamentals? and; (b) Is there any evidence of a contagion effect after controlling for the potential effects of economic fundamentals? Using pooled annual data for 19 developing countries spanning […]
Content Type(s): Staff research, Staff working papers Topic(s): Exchange rates JEL Code(s): F, F3
June 11, 1998

The outlook for the Canadian economy and monetary policy

Remarks Bernard Bonin The Canadian Association of Financial Planners Québec, Québec
In mid-May we published our semi-annual Report on monetary policy, covering data up to April 24th. That means we now have new data available for the last two months. Furthermore, our report also pointed to a much greater-than-usual degree of uncertainty about the outlook for the Canadian economy.

Buying Back Government Bonds: Mechanics and Other Considerations

Staff Working Paper 1998-9 Toni Gravelle
With the elimination of the federal deficit, the Bank of Canada, the Department of Finance, and financial market participants are examining ways to manage the reduction in the stock of marketable debt. This paper summarizes three different methods—reverse auction, over-the-counter purchases, and conversions—that could be used to buy back Government of Canada bonds before they […]
Content Type(s): Staff research, Staff working papers Topic(s): Debt management, Financial markets JEL Code(s): G, G1

Easing Restrictions on the Stripping and Reconstitution of Government of Canada Bonds

Staff Working Paper 1998-8 David Bolder, Serge Boisvert
The Department of Finance and the Bank of Canada, as its fiscal agent, work closely with financial market participants in the management of the federal government's debt program. From the government's perspective, maintaining a liquid well-functioning market in Government of Canada securities is a key factor in ensuring that debt-service costs are minimized. It is […]
Content Type(s): Staff research, Staff working papers Topic(s): Debt management JEL Code(s): G, G1
May 28, 1998

Opening Statement before the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance

Opening statement Gordon Thiessen House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance
Mr. Chairman, my colleagues and I are pleased to appear before your committee on a regular basis following the release of the Bank of Canada's Monetary Policy Report. It gives us a chance to discuss with you a range of economic and monetary issues. More generally, our semi-annual Report and sessions such as this one […]
May 27, 1998

Globalized Financial Markets and Monetary Policy

Remarks Gordon Thiessen La Conférence de Montréal Montréal, Quebec
Globalization - that is, the growing integration and interdependence of national economies - is changing dramatically the economic landscape. Countries are trading more goods and services, an increasing number of firms now operate across national borders, and savers and borrowers have greater access than ever before to global financial markets.
May 14, 1998

Recent developments in the monetary aggregates and their implications

This article examines the developments in the monetary aggregates over the course of 1997 and their implications for future economic activity. The narrow aggregate, M1, grew rapidly in the first half of 1997 but slowed somewhat during the second half of the year. Much of the strong growth in this aggregate over the last several years has been associated with a higher demand for transactions balances as interest rates declined and economic activity revived. There were some special factors at play, however, that are discussed in the article. The Bank expects some slowing in M1 growth through 1998 and into 1999. This would be consistent with a trend of inflation within the inflation-control target range of 1 to 3 per cent over the next couple of years. Growth in the broad aggregate, M2+, continued to be distorted by the shift of savings out of fixed-term deposits into mutual funds. A broader aggregate that includes M2+, CSBs, and all mutual funds and thus provides a better estimate of broad money growth, grew at a moderate pace during 1997. The recent behaviour of the broad monetary aggregates continues to suggest that inflation will remain low in coming years.
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