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34 Results

Are Product Spreads Useful for Forecasting? An Empirical Evaluation of the Verleger Hypothesis

Staff Working Paper 2013-25 Christiane Baumeister, Lutz Kilian, Xiaoqing Zhou
Notwithstanding a resurgence in research on out-of-sample forecasts of the price of oil in recent years, there is one important approach to forecasting the real price of oil which has not been studied systematically to date.

A Blessing in Disguise: The Implications of High Global Oil Prices for the North American Market

Staff Working Paper 2013-23 Ron Alquist, Justin-Damien Guénette
We examine the implications of increased unconventional crude oil production in North America. This production increase has been made possible by the existence of alternative oil-recovery technologies and persistently elevated oil prices that make these technologies commercially viable.

What Central Bankers Need to Know about Forecasting Oil Prices

Staff Working Paper 2013-15 Christiane Baumeister, Lutz Kilian
Forecasts of the quarterly real price of oil are routinely used by international organizations and central banks worldwide in assessing the global and domestic economic outlook, yet little is known about how best to generate such forecasts. Our analysis breaks new ground in several dimensions.

The Effects of Oil Price Uncertainty on the Macroeconomy

Staff Working Paper 2012-40 Soojin Jo
This paper investigates the effect of oil price uncertainty on real economic activity using a quarterly VAR with stochastic volatility in mean. Stochastic volatility allows oil price uncertainty to vary separately from changes in the level of oil prices, and thus the impact of oil price uncertainty can be examined in a more flexible yet tractable way.

Commodities and Monetary Policy: Implications for Inflation and Price Level Targeting

We examine the relative ability of simple inflation targeting (IT) and price level targeting (PLT) monetary policy rules to minimize both inflation variability and business cycle fluctuations in Canada for shocks that have important consequences for global commodity prices.

Growth in Emerging Market Economies and the Commodity Boom of 2003–2008: Evidence from Growth Forecast Revisions

Staff Working Paper 2012-8 Elif Arbatli, Garima Vasishtha
Demand for industrial raw materials from emerging economies, particularly emerging Asia, is widely believed to have fueled the surge in oil and industrial commodity prices during 2002-2008. The paper first presents a simple storage model in which commodity prices respond to market participant’s changing expectations of the future macroeconomic environment.

Time-Varying Effects of Oil Supply Shocks on the U.S. Economy

Staff Working Paper 2012-2 Christiane Baumeister, Gert Peersman
We use vector autoregressions with drifting coefficients and stochastic volatility to investigate how the dynamic effects of oil supply shocks on the U.S. economy have changed over time. We find a substantial decline in the short-run price elasticity of oil demand since the mid-eighties.

Real-Time Analysis of Oil Price Risks Using Forecast Scenarios

Staff Working Paper 2012-1 Christiane Baumeister, Lutz Kilian
Recently, there has been increased interest in real-time forecasts of the real price of crude oil. Standard oil price forecasts based on reduced-form regressions or based on oil futures prices do not allow consumers of forecasts to explore how much the forecast would change relative to the baseline forecast under alternative scenarios about future oil demand and oil supply conditions.

The Role of Time-Varying Price Elasticities in Accounting for Volatility Changes in the Crude Oil Market

Staff Working Paper 2011-28 Christiane Baumeister, Gert Peersman
There has been a systematic increase in the volatility of the real price of crude oil since 1986, followed by a decline in the volatility of oil production since the early 1990s. We explore reasons for this evolution. We show that a likely explanation of this empirical fact is that both the short-run price elasticities of oil demand and of oil supply have declined considerably since the second half of the 1980s.
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