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112 Results

The Implications of Transmission and Information Lags for the Stabilization Bias and Optimal Delegation

Staff Working Paper 2004-37 Jean-Paul Lam, Florian Pelgrin
In two recent papers, Jensen (2002) and Walsh (2003), using a hybrid New Keynesian model, demonstrate that a regime that targets either nominal income growth or the change in the output gap can effectively replicate the outcome under commitment and hence reduce the size of the stabilization bias.

The Bank of Canada's Business Outlook Survey: An Assessment

Staff Working Paper 2004-15 Monica Martin, Cristiano Papile
Since the autumn of 1997, the Bank of Canada's regional offices (located in Halifax, Montréal, Toronto, Calgary, and Vancouver) have conducted consultations with businesses across Canada on a quarterly basis. These consultations are now referred to as the Business Outlook Survey (BOS).

Why Does Private Consumption Rise After a Government Spending Shock?

Staff Working Paper 2003-43 Hafedh Bouakez, Nooman Rebei
Recent empirical evidence suggests that private consumption is crowded-in by government spending. This outcome violates existing macroeconomic theory, according to which the negative wealth effect brought about by a rise in public expenditure should decrease consumption.

The Macroeconomic Effects of Military Buildups in a New Neoclassical Synthesis Framework

Staff Working Paper 2003-12 Alain Paquet, Louis Phaneuf, Nooman Rebei
The authors study the macroeconomic consequences of large military buildups using a New Neoclassical Synthesis (NNS) approach that combines nominal rigidities within imperfectly competitive goods and labour markets. They show that the predictions of the NNS framework generally are consistent with the sign, timing, and magnitude of how hours worked, after-tax real wages, and output actually respond to an upsurge in military purchases.

Entrepreneurship, Inequality, and Taxation

Staff Working Paper 2002-14 Césaire Meh
This paper confirms the conjecture that the evaluation of tax policy leads to very different conclusions once the role of entrepreneurs is considered. Contrary to previous literature, the author finds that switching from a progressive to a proportional income tax system has a negligible effect on wealth inequality in the United States.
Content Type(s): Staff research, Staff working papers Topic(s): Economic models, Fiscal policy JEL Code(s): D, D3, D31, E, E6, E62, H, H2, H20, H23
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