Subrata Sarker

Director

Subrata Sarker is the Director of the Advanced Economies Division of the International Economic Analysis Department. He joined the Bank in 2010 as a Senior Analyst. Prior to this, he was in charge of the monitoring, projection and analysis of the US economy. He also worked in the global Issues division on a variety of economic issues related to macroeconomics and international economics and regularly provided policy inputs for Bank’s role in international organizations and for global macroeconomic co-ordinations such as the G20.

Contact

Subrata Sarker

Director
International Economic Analysis
Advanced Economies Division

Bank of Canada
234 Wellington Street
Ottawa, ON, K1A 0G9

Latest

November 16, 2017 An Update on the Neutral Rate of Interest

The neutral rate serves as a benchmark for measuring monetary stimulus and provides a medium- to long-run anchor for the real policy rate. Global neutral rate estimates have been falling over the past few decades. Factors such as population aging, high corporate savings, and low trend productivity growth are likely to continue supporting a low global neutral rate. These global factors as well as domestic factors are exerting downward pres-sure on the Canadian real neutral rate, which is estimated to be between 0.5 to 1.5 per cent. This low neutral rate has important implications for monetary policy and financial stability.

Digitalization and Inflation: A Review of the Literature

In the past few years, many have postulated that the possible disinflationary effects of digitalization could explain the subdued inflation in advanced economies. In this note, we review the evidence found in the literature. We look at three main channels.

Low Inflation in Advanced Economies: Facts and Drivers

Since the global financial crisis, core inflation has been persistently below target in most advanced economies. Recently, it has weakened further in several advanced economies despite gradually diminishing slack. This note reviews recent developments in core inflation across advanced economies and identifies distinctive patterns across regions.
Content Type(s): Staff Research, Staff Analytical Notes Topic(s): Inflation and prices, International topics JEL Code(s): E, E0, E3, E31, F, F0

November 19, 2015 Is Slower Growth the New Normal in Advanced Economies?

This article reviews and examines some of the main explanations for the slow growth that many advanced economies continue to experience seven years after the 2007–09 global financial crisis. Does this muted recovery reflect just a prolonged cycle in the aftermath of a financial crisis? Is it due to a structural inadequacy of demand leading to a long-lasting liquidity trap? Or is it largely supply side in nature, reflecting demographic and technological factors?

November 13, 2014 Spillover Effects of Quantitative Easing on Emerging-Market Economies

While quantitative easing (QE) in the United States likely increased capital flows to emerging-market economies (EMEs), putting upward pressure on asset prices and exchange rates, diverging fundamentals between advanced economies and EMEs were also important drivers. Evidence suggests that the benefits of QE to EMEs, in higher global demand and increased confidence, appear to outweigh the costs. When advanced economies begin to normalize monetary policy, the best defence for EMEs against any potential instability is likely to be further strengthening of their macroeconomic and financial policy frameworks.

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