Patrick Alexander

Senior Economist

Patrick Alexander is a Senior Economist in the International Economic Analysis Department. His primary research interests include international trade, macroeconomics and applied econometrics. Patrick Alexander received his Ph.D. in Economics from Queen’s University.

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Patrick Alexander

Senior Economist
International Economic Analysis
Advanced Economies Division

Bank of Canada
234 Wellington Street
Ottawa, ON, K1A 0G9

Curriculum vitae

Latest

The Welfare Effects of Protection: A General Equilibrium Analysis of Canada’s National Policy

Staff Working Paper 2017-18 Patrick Alexander, Ian Keay
In this paper, we study the impact of Canada’s adoption of protectionist trade policy in 1879 on Canadian welfare. Under the National Policy the Canadian average weighted tariff increased from 14% to 21%. The conventional view is that this was a distortionary policy that negatively affected Canadian welfare.

Vertical Specialization and Gains from Trade

Staff Working Paper 2017-17 Patrick Alexander
Multi-stage production is widely recognized as an important feature of the modern global economy. This feature has been incorporated into many state-of-the-art quantitative trade models, and has been shown to deliver significant additional gains from international trade.

Assessing Global Potential Output Growth

This note estimates potential output growth for the global economy through 2019. While there is considerable uncertainty surrounding our estimates, overall we expect global potential output growth to rise modestly, from 3.1 per cent in 2016 to 3.4 per cent in 2019.

An Improved Equation for Predicting Canadian Non-Commodity Exports

Staff Discussion Paper 2017-1 Patrick Alexander, Jean-Philippe Cayen, Alex Proulx
We estimate two new equations for Canadian non-commodity exports (NCX) that incorporate three important changes relative to the current equation used at the Bank of Canada.

Producer Heterogeneity, Value-Added, and International Trade

Staff Working Paper 2016-54 Patrick Alexander
Standard new trade models depict producers as heterogeneous in total factor productivity. In this paper, I adapt the Eaton and Kortum (2002) model of international trade to incorporate tradable intermediate goods and producer heterogeneity in value-added productivity.

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Education

Ph.D., Queen's University

Research Interests

  • International Trade
  • Macroeconomics
  • Applied Econometrics

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