Gerald Stuber

Research Advisor

Gerald Stuber is a Research Advisor with the Economic Research and Analysis team in the Currency Department. His current interests include monitoring and assessing digital alternatives to cash and their implications for central banks. Gerald is also involved in the Currency Department’s counterfeiting situational analysis process. He obtained his Masters in Economics from the University of Calgary.

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Gerald Stuber

Research Advisor
Currency
Economic Research and Analysis

Bank of Canada
234 Wellington Street
Ottawa, ON, K1A 0G9

Latest

May 14, 2015 The Use of Cash in Canada

The Bank of Canada’s 2013 Methods-of-Payment Survey indicates that the share of cash in the overall number of retail transactions has continued to decrease, mainly because of increased use of contactless credit cards. The share of cash in the total value of retail transactions was virtually unchanged from 2009 to 2013. In particular, the value share of cash transactions above $50 increased. Automated banking machines (ABMs), still the major source of cash for Canadians, were used less often in 2013 than in 2009. Cash use in Canada is broadly similar to that in Australia and the United States.

Electronic Money and Payments: Recent Developments and Issues

Staff Discussion Paper 2014-2 Ben Fung, Miguel Molico, Gerald Stuber
The authors review recent developments in retail payments in Canada and elsewhere, with a focus on e-money products, and assess their potential public policy implications.

November 15, 2012 The Changing Landscape for Retail Payments in Canada and the Implications for the Demand for Cash

Over the past 20 years, there has been a major shift away from the use of paper-based retail payment instruments, such as cash and cheques, toward electronic means of payment, such as debit cards and credit cards. Recent Bank of Canada research on consumers’ choice of payment instruments indicates that cash is frequently used for transactions with low values because of its speed, ease of use and wide acceptance, while debit and credit cards are more commonly used for transactions with higher values because of perceived attributes such as safety and record keeping. While innovations in retail payments currently being introduced into the Canadian marketplace could lead to a further reduction in the use of cash over the longer term, the implications for the use of cash of some of the structural and regulatory developments under way are less clear.

Implications of Uncertainty about Long-Run Inflation and the Price Level

Staff Working Paper 2001-16 Gerald Stuber
This paper surveys recent developments in the theoretical and empirical literature on the economic implications of uncertainty about the longer-term outlook for inflation. In particular, the linkages between inflation, long-run inflation uncertainty, and aggregate economic activity in industrial economies have become considerably better understood during the past decade.
Content Type(s): Staff Research, Staff Working Papers Topic(s): Inflation: costs and benefits JEL Code(s): E, E2, E22, E3, E31, E4, E44

August 17, 2001 The Changing Effects of Energy-Price Shocks on Economic Activity and Inflation

In this article the author examines the effects that major changes in energy prices in recent years have had on inflation and on the pace of economic expansion. These are then compared with the effects of the oil-price shocks that occurred in the 1970s and early 1980s. Changes in the intensity of energy use are examined, as well as developments in Canada's merchandise trade surplus in energy commodities and products. The author also considers the effects that a monetary policy anchored to low and stable inflation could have on price-setting behaviour and thus on the pass-through of higher energy costs to core inflation in Canada and in other industrial countries.

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Research Interests

  • Retail payments innovation
  • Money and banking

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